Thursday, February 12, 2009

Women of Art, Talent & Wisdom

My very creative son (of Onision fame) and I were just talking about working in the creative industries (e.g., being an artist, writer, psychic, actor or anybody in the expressive entertainment or spiritual healing industry) and how that seems to automatically place such individuals under the "worthy to be criticized" banner.

Try being an engineer or research scientist, however, and society criticizes: not so much! {Oh the silly judgments we make!}

Regardless: I recognize my innate value and encourage my great creative mind to live abundantly. I focus on providing the highest quality of service without assuming my colleagues are just another enormously mentally-unstable group of individuals, at your service.

Doug and I were looking at his retirement funds the other night and realize he's lost more than $35,000 in this last year's fiasco. Thank gawd neither of us judge the other's value by how much money we make (or how free from critical thinking we are). LOL. I'd stick it out with him if we lived in a motor-home with my chickens attached by cages to the back.

IN OTHER NEWS: I'm carpooling to go hear Starhawk speak at the
17th Annual Women of Wisdom Conference tonight. This year's theme: "Building Bridges for Global Community Through Social Activism." I also cannot wait to chat with the woman I'm carpooling with as she's also motivated; much like me. Hopefully, after the lecture, I'll have something exciting to blog about; tomorrow.

8 comments:

greeneyes67 said...

You are so lucky to be hearing Starhawk! I am extremely jealous. I bet she is an amazing speaker. Hope you have lots of fun and get really motivated. Just the energy in the place will be incredible...

SunTiger said...

I will have to blog about it tomorrow. Believe me I feel lucky -- wish I had the time to go to her all-day speech tomorrow (must settle for just the evening version).

Æshe said...

Wow, I wish I could go, that would be so interesting. I can't wait to read what if was like from you. :D Yeah being an artist really opens you to the critics, which I guess is understandable saying that art is in the eye of the veiwer, while sience for the most part is seen as black and white, no room for interpritation...or so they say. Though I have heard of many sientiests coming under fire for findings and theories that they have...take my uncle, he runs a lab the deals with stem cells...now he gets critisizm

Fijufic said...

Hmmmm...

the stories I hear and see about money are awful most of the time....

Im on the front line of that mess and it is getting pretty ugly on the commercial/construction side.

Knuckle up!!!!

Bobby

Breath-e said...

Just so you know, I'll be checking in tomorrow to read your thoughts on Starhawk.

full disclosure please...

:)

SunTiger said...

Æshe ~ During Starhawk's speech last night, I realized that art has often been considered a less than masculine adventure while being an engineer has traditionally been associated with male careers . . . wonder if that's part of what the criticism is about (or do people criticize art because they know artists CHANNEL information from beyond . . .). Thank you for mentioning the stem cell research . . . the criticism there also seems to stem from a religious bent. Hmmmm (much to think about).

Fijufic ~ You obviously are not feeling inspired by the new stimulus package?

Breathe-e ~ Wow. Thanks for the compliment of your interest!

Alianna said...

More often than not I come to your site and leave feeling like I've seen a new (and often improved) angle I hadn't seen before. I originally thought, "absolutely not; everyone gets criticized for what they do!", but now i'm wondering if you mean the CHOICE to go into that career in the first place.

While I have seen proponents of abortion or stem cell researchers get criticized for their personal viewpoint and decision to join the movement, I've never seen an artist personally criticized. Most of the art in my experience has been criticized on the art; whether one person likes or dislikes it, not whether they like, know or even recognize the artist. (As a side note, I recently saw a post somewhere on the web about a famous violinist who played in a NYC subway station as part of an experiment. He earned about $32 dollars and the attention of children for the most part. Later that night, he played a show where tickets were over $100 each. It was mostly about attention. I'll see if I can find it.)

To stop before this turns into a huge message: I find a lot of engineers, especially architects, face a lot of criticism about what and how they build. Check out the ROM in Toronto.

SunTiger said...

I appreciate your feedback Aliana. Most of what I'm talking about has to do with the social-stereotypes. Such common sayings as "starving artist" apply and so many stories told of famous writers who died wearing rags because they could afford no better. Even more depict artists, performers and writers as depressed chain-smoking alcoholics. I don't know of any engineers who get accused of being suicidal maniacs.

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